Anavils
Ahir (Ayar)
Bhil
Charan
Dubala
Jain
Kangashiya
Kapols
Kathi
Khoja
Kharwa-Khalsi
Koli
Lohanas
Mussalmans
Mer
Miyana
Nat-Bajaniya
Naagar
Padhar
Parsis
Patanvadia
Patidars (Patel)
Rajputs
Rabaris
Sindhis
Sidi
Targala - Bhavaya
Vanzara
Vadi
Vaghari
Vankar
Vohras

 

The Vankar or weavers followed their ancestral profession of weaving for a long time. The community was meted out a treatment like the untouchables.
        The textile industry of India was far ahead and prosperous before the advent of machine-age. The fabrics made in India were sent to far off countries. The weavers community was in a good condition at that time. Industrialisation took place under the British rule and the art of hand weaving suffered a setback. Weavers had to confront unemployment. Proverty struck them with vengeance and their condition continuously went to deteriorating. Vankars live with their community brethren. The area or the street of their dwellings was called ‘Vankarvas’. They built their houses with clay with a small verandah in the front. They install a handloom in one of the rooms. The flooring of that room is normally at a low level. They keep their houses comparatively clean. Some better-off Vankar families now live in concrete houses. Many Vankar families have shifted to other professions. Few educated Vankars have joined government and private jobs. According to a legend, Shatraling Lake constructed by Siddhraj Jaysinh of Patan remained without water due to the curse of Jasama Odan. The occultists suggested a sacrifice of a man with numerous qualities and peculiarities. Such a man was found in ‘Mayo’ of the Vankar community. He came forward to sacrifice his own life only with a condition of abolishing one of the most insulting custom imposed upon his community.