Anavils
Ahir (Ayar)
Bhil
Charan
Dubala
Jain
Kangashiya
Kapols
Kathi
Khoja
Kharwa-Khalsi
Koli
Lohanas
Mussalmans
Mer
Miyana
Nat-Bajaniya
Naagar
Padhar
Parsis
Patanvadia
Patidars (Patel)
Rajputs
Rabaris
Sindhis
Sidi
Targala - Bhavaya
Vanzara
Vadi
Vaghari
Vankar
Vohras

 

Most children frequently see the Vadi on streets showing his magic skills and performance with snakes. Vadi plays a ‘mahir’- a peculiar type of flute and attracts the kids to his street show.
        A Vadi keeps a bamboo scale having a basket at each end, called Kavad. He plays a flute and opens the basket only to bring out snakes from it. The snake shakes its head with the music of the flute. The performance with snake is the livelihood of a Vadi. He gets some money or commodities from the spectators in return. Madari, Garudi and Nathbawa also resort to this profession.
        There are about seven sub communities like lalvadi, phoolvadi, maanvadi etc. Lalwadi and phoolwadi are prominent among them, who more or less live a nomadic life. They put up at one place for about a fortnight in tent like dwellings.
        The Vadis normally gather at Vadhiyar village near Radhanpur during the month of Maha of Hindu calendar. Some 200 to 300 families meet there and settle the social occasions like betrothal and marriage.
        Most Vadis wear a dhoti and a shirt. They put an old fashioned shoe or a pavadi made of wood. A Kavad is a part of their attire. They also wear a rosary of Rudraksh beads. The Vadi female wears a large and colouring petticoat, a blouse and a thin cloth on the head.
        The Vadis are expert in catching the snakes. They claim that they can eliminate the poisonous effects of snakebite with their miraculous power of mantra. While catching a snake, they swear of the period for which they intend to keep the snake. As soon as the said period is over, they set the very snake free and try for another one.