Anavils
Ahir (Ayar)
Bhil
Charan
Dubala
Jain
Kangashiya
Kapols
Kathi
Khoja
Kharwa-Khalsi
Koli
Lohanas
Mussalmans
Mer
Miyana
Nat-Bajaniya
Naagar
Padhar
Parsis
Patanvadia
Patidars (Patel)
Rajputs
Rabaris
Sindhis
Sidi
Targala - Bhavaya
Vanzara
Vadi
Vaghari
Vankar
Vohras

  

The Targala-Bhavaya community has rarely seen the light of prosperity. The princely rulers and Nawabs maintained them, gifted villages or fixed maintenance for their living. There were instances of land given away to them in gift.

            The Targala and the Bhavaya mainly entertained the people with their musical and dramatic skills. They were the exponents of the dramatic skills. They were the exponents of the folk-art of Bhavai. The community would stage a show to help any disabled, weak or widow of their community. They were not sure of their income. Though they have no formal education in co-operative society laws or norms, as the community stirctly follows rules of co-operative society for years together. A troupe of 10 to 20 members distributes the income among themselves according to the ability and importance of a member and the necessity of their bretheren. The theory of distribution is crude, but the sense of co-operation is certainly there.

            The ‘Nayak’ or the leader normally owns the musical instruments. Dress and other properties for performance are a responsibility of each member. The treasurer of the trope is called ‘Gallo’ and the deposits are called ‘Beraj’. A certain portion of the income is kept for a religious purpose. A free for all food facility was once available running on such meney. They also contributed form such funds to renovation of temples, stepwell, well and construction of inns.

            A male performs the female-role or a ‘vesh’ in Bhavai. The man playing a female role is called ‘Kanchaliyo’. The manager of the troupe is called ‘Kotwal’.

            The troupe moves from one place to another for the performance of a Bhavai. The attraction and involvement of the people for Bhavai have receeded with the advent of time. One can hardly imagine from their miseries these days that they were the respected Brahmins once upon a time. The community has preserved and nourished the cultural heritage of Bhavai in spite of the innumerable odds.

            The attire of Targala-Bhavaya has no significant feature. Males were dhoti, long shirt, coaty, and a black cap. The women put on the traditional Gujarati dress.