Anavils
Ahir (Ayar)
Bhil
Charan
Dubala
Jain
Kangashiya
Kapols
Kathi
Khoja
Kharwa-Khalsi
Koli
Lohanas
Mussalmans
Mer
Miyana
Nat-Bajaniya
Naagar
Padhar
Parsis
Patanvadia
Patidars (Patel)
Rajputs
Rabaris
Sindhis
Sidi
Targala - Bhavaya
Vanzara
Vadi
Vaghari
Vankar
Vohras

  

Gujarat has always welcomed guests and accepted the outsiders. Many sects and communities like the Yadvas, the Hoons, the Iranis, the Muslims and the Parsis have come here settled on the land the mixed with the people. The Sindhis were perhaps the lasts of the outsiders to come to Gujarat.
        The Sindhis were basically Indians and still they are Indians. Their nationality, culture, religion and their social set-up are truly Indians. With the partition of India in 1947, the Hindu-Sikh people living in Sindh came to be known as Sindhis and they migrated from newly formed Pakistan to India and settled in Gujarat as well as other parts of the country.
        Though the culture and the civilization are not different, the local character gives the Sindhis a separate identity. Language, Literature and some distinguished traits gave them a particular social character, which they preserved with care even after migrating from their land. Perhaps that is the reason why they are still Sindhis, in spite of being Hindus or Sikhs.
        There are two sub-communities among the Sindhi (1) the Bhaibandh and (2) the Aamil. Bhaibandh Sindhis were originally engaged in agriculture. They lost their land in the wake of the partition. They turned into trader community after migration. Aamil were and have still remained employed people. Numbers of Aamils have joined either in civil service or government jobs or in educational field. The Aamils believe that they hail from the ruling class. Yet many Aamils are employed with the Bhaibhand Sindhis if they are economically not well-off. The Aamils Hindus were originally the administrators of Muslim kings and rulers of Sindh. The Bhaibhand and Aamil are the two sub-classes and not the two separate communities. The change in profession or occupation may result into the change in class of the community. Social exchanges between them are a common feature.
        The Sindhis have meticulously preserved their language, literature, social customs a religious ritual. This has halped them establishing themselves as a separate unit. They follow the rituals of Yognopavit and clean-shaven peculiar nose-ring made of a gem and two pearls. She is also given bangles of ivory, which cover her both hands fully. Some of the very old customs are not followed now very rigidly.
        Chetti Chand is their main annual festival that falls on the first day of chaitra, the sixth month of the Hindu calendar. Almost all the castes and communities celebrate the festival of welcome-spring in one or the other form. The Sindhis welcomes the colorful season through chetti Chand. They worship ‘Dariya Saheb’ as a symbol of the holy waters of river Sindhu. A small lamp is placed in a dish filled with wheat flour and is then floated into the water. Sweet rice is distributed as ‘Prasad’. The elements of Durga-pooja of Bengal, Ganeshotsav of Maharashtra or Tajiya of Muslims are evident in the celebration of chetti-Chand.
        The food habits of the Sindhis are very simple, but they are very much fond of sweets. The Sindhi males wear simple dress like trousers and shirts. The women love silky and shining costumes as well as ornaments. The Sindhis have plunged into many occupations and they have often changed from one profession to another. That has inspired them to accept the modern influence in various fields of life.